[Weekend Watch List] Pentru că omenirea nu stă locului

[Weekend Watch List] Pentru că omenirea nu stă locului

 Oamenilor nu le place să stea locului, asta ne arată și toate migrațiile omenirii, încă din neolitic. Nu stăteau în trafic pe vremea aia, nici nu se plictiseau la check in, dar călătoria dura câteva generații. Fast forward în 2019, omenirea stă mult în trafic zilele acestea. Mașinile zburătoare nu sunt aici încă, teleportarea pare destul de departe de posibilitățile noastre, așa că tot cu avioane, trenuri și mașini e nevoie să ne descurcăm. Despre ele avem tot felul de informații în lista noastră de weekend: de la autostrada dintre nori și cel mai lung zbor din lume, la aeroporturile din 2025, soluții pentru trafic și formele rotunde ale mașinilor din prezent.

 

How Airlines Decide Where to Fly

 

The Plane Highway in the Sky

Over the North Atlantic, where there is no radar coverage, planes don't fly like they normally fly. They follow a set of daily tracks that act like highways in the sky.

 

Airline Law and Regulation: A Brief History [POLICYbrief]

 Why is the airline industry one of the most heavily regulated and subsidized industries in America? Gary Leff, Mercatus Center CFO and author at ViewFromTheWing.com, explains his point of view.

   

Why do airlines sell too many tickets? - Nina Klietsch

Have you ever sat in a doctor’s office for hours, despite having an appointment? Has a hotel turned down your reservation because it’s full? Have you been bumped off a flight that you paid for? These are all symptoms of overbooking, a practice where businesses sell or book more than their capacity. So why do they do it? Nina Klietsch explains the math behind this frustrating practice.

  

Hop Onboard the Shortest Flight in the World

Got a tight 80 seconds to spare? It’s all the time you need to fly commercial across the Orkney Islands. The word’s shortest nonstop flight is a tiny hop between the islands of Westray and Papa Westray in the United Kingdom, a mere 1.7 miles (2.7 km) apart. For the past 50 years, Scottish airline Loganair has been transporting islanders between the two archipelagos, becoming an integral part of many passengers daily commute. Clocking in at under two minutes, this might be the swiftest and sweetest way to get to work.

 

How to Survive the Longest Flight in the World

WSJ's Scott McCartney went nonstop from Newark, N.J., to Singapore, testing his tips on how to survive more than 18 hours on a plane to help you with your next long-haul flight.

    

The Economics of Airline Class

 

Inside the world's most popular business jet | CNBC International

 What can $10 million get you for a private jet? CNBC's Uptin Saiidi visits Embraer's line of private jets at the Singapore Airshow 2018 to find out.

 

    

When 'psycho' automation left this pilot powerless

For the first time since 2008, the captain of the imperilled Qantas Flight 72 reveals his horrific experience of automation's dark side.

 

Flying the Boeing 737 Max 8: A pilot’s view from inside the cockpit

Capt. Dennis Tajer of American Airlines and the Allied Pilots Association explains what it’s like to fly the Boeing 737 Max 8, and why a new flight control system was a surprise to pilots. That system could have played a role in two recent Max 8 crashes

   

How All Passengers Survived the Miracle on the Hudson

 When US Airways Flight 1549 loses engine power moments after leaving LaGuardia, there's only one option: an emergency landing on the Hudson.

 

3 things I learned while my plane crashed | Ric Elias

Ric Elias had a front-row seat on Flight 1549, the plane that crash-landed in the Hudson River in New York in January 2009. What went through his mind as the doomed plane went down? At TED, he tells his story publicly for the first tim

 

Airplane black boxes, explained

 Sometimes flight recorders are the only way the victims' families will know what happened to the plane.

 

What It's Like To Sleep In A Boeing 747 Hotel Room

Jumbostay has been on the tarmac of Arlanda Airport, Stockholm, since 2009. The Boeing 747 plane was built in 1976, and was last operated by Transjet, a Swedish airline that went bankrupt in 2002. It was converted by owner Oscar Diös into a functioning hotel. 

  

Where jumbo jets go to die - The great aeroplane graveyard | 60 Minutes Australia

Take a flight through the twilight zone to the big hangar in the sky. The place where jumbo jets go to die. The great aeroplane graveyard. In 2014, Charles Wooley was given a one way ticket to the middle of nowhere (but somehow he made his way back!) to report on this most amazing of spectacles. You might think it's a story about the decline of the airline industry, but in fact it's the exact opposite.

 

  What Flying Was Like in the 60s

  

How four rogue satellites could change the spaceflight industry

Earlier this year, a company launched four tiny satellites into orbit without permission. These “rogue satellites” caused an uproar in the space community, and in the future, others like them could increase the risk of catastrophic collisions in orbit. We talked to some space experts about what’s at stake when no one knows exactly what’s up there in space.

 

The next step for airlines | Sadiq Gillani | TEDxBerlin

 This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Sadiq Gillani gave insights on the next steps for the airline industry.

 

Aviation's Next Great Adventure | Andrew Shepherd | TEDxDayton

The Wright Brothers’ first flight. Lindbergh flying across the Atlantic. Armstrong’s first steps on the moon. These great feats changed the world and aviation expert Andrew Shepherd has an idea for the next great challenge.

   

5 Airports Taking-Off by 2025 | The B1M

State-of-the-art facilities, automated systems, AI, vast construction project teams and plans from some of the world’s leading architects - we explore the new age of airport design.

  

    

The Problem With Fast Trains: What Happened to Hovertrains?

In 1974, a French train sets a speed record, exceeding 250 miles per hour. But this train is unlike any other before it. Instead of rolling on train wheels, it hovers on a cushion of air. In the 1970’s hovertrains were seriously being considered the solution to slow, antiquated railways, which increasingly had to compete with new superhighways and even intercity air travel.

 

  

Why China Is so Good at Building Railways

  

What If We Built a Road Around the World?

What if we constructed a road around the world that connected most of Earth's continents? It'd be cool to drive from Europe to North America and some other places... I guess

 

How cars went from boxy to curvy

 The big shift from boxy cars in the '80s to curvy cars in the '90s, explained.

 

Why Norway is full of Teslas

Oslo is the Tesla capital of the world.

 

It's not you. Commuting is bad for your health.

My commute is like a second job, and it might be killing me.

   

How to Fix Traffic Forever

 

 

The Time China Had a 12 Day Long Traffic Jam

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